PGP/GPG Keys

I generated my first PGP RSA keypair way back in 1993. Some friends and I played around with PGP for e-mail for a while, but at the time few people knew about encryption and even fewer cared: the "no-one would want to read my mail" attitude meant that convincing people they should get their heads round all of this was a pretty hard sell. The fact that the software of the day was about as user-friendly as a cornered wolverine didn't help either.

The PGP software had moved forward a fair bit both technically and in terms of usability (up to "cornered rat") by 2002, when I generated my current DSS keypair. By this time, it was pretty common to see things like security advisories signed using PGP, but only the geekiest of the geeks bothered with e-mail encryption.

Here we are in 2006: I still use this technology primarily to check signatures on things like e-mailed security advisories (I use Thunderbird and Enigmail), but I've finally found a need to use my own key, and it isn't for e-mail.

Over the years, PGP (now standardised as OpenPGP) has become the main way of signing open source packages so that downloaders have a cryptographic level of assurance that the package they download was built by someone they trust. Of course, the majority of people still don't check these signatures but systems like RPM often do so on their behalf behind the scenes.

I've agreed to take on some limited package build responsibilities for such a project recently, so I've installed the latest versions of everything and updated my about page so that people can get copies of my public keys. Of course, there is no particular reason anyone should trust those keys; this is supposed to be where the web of trust is supposed to come in, by allowing someone to build a path to my keys through a chain of people they trust (directly or indirectly). Unfortunately, my current public key is completely unadorned by useful third-party signatures. If you think you can help change that (i.e., you already know me, already have an OpenPGP keypair and would be willing to talk about signing my public key) please let me know.